Academic Enrichment Center

The Divisions of Academic Affairs and Student Life are pleased to partner in support of the Academic Enrichment Center (AEC). Located on the first floor of Lilly Library, the AEC is a comprehensive student center comprised of three offices designed to support the learning and living of the Earlham student body.

The AEC is guided by the mission of Earlham College—to assist every student in discovering the teacher within. Focusing its work on enhancing the broad range of academic and social skills necessary for student success, the AEC offers all students a variety of support services, including learning strategy support, peer tutoring and writing consultation. With the goal of transformative student experiences, we understand the collaborative support and individualization needed to help students achieve to their fullest potential.

The Office of Disability and Accessibility Services (ODAS), the Quantitative Reasoning Center and the Writing Center are here to support your unique and varied learning style to ensure an Epic Earlham journey.

Professor working with students

Academic Enrichment Center

Office of Disability and Accessibility Services

The Office of Disability and Accessibility provides assistance and reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. The College recognizes the importance of providing reasonable accommodations in all spaces of the campus, from housing to study skills to advocacy.

Through this office, you can find:

Reasonable accommodation for certified disabilities, including academic, housing, assistance animal and/or meal exception.

Academic skills workshops that teach learning and living strategies for time management, academic and assignment planning, personal advocacy and communicating with professors.

Learning strategy support available for students in a host of areas, including reading with a purpose, note-taking, developing good study habits, creating a routine and test taking.

Disability advocacy that supports and empowers students to communicate their needs and experiences toward improved performance, relationships and academic and social success.

Questions? Contact ODAS

We’re here to help with any questions or concerns you might have regarding accommodations or services.

Contact Laura Jackson, interim disability services coordinator, or email us at [email protected]

Quantitative Reasoning Center

Questions? Contact the QRC

We’re here to help with any questions or concerns you might have about the services we provide and how they can benefit you.

Contact Matt Brown, director of the Quantitative Reasoning Center.

The Quantitative Reasoning Center (QRC) provides resources for students to better their study skills and improve their academic literacy. The QRC wants to see every student succeed and reach their full potential, both inside and outside of the classroom.

Through this office, you can find:

Peer tutoring (group and individual) that encourages collaborative learning amongst students and is available for all major subject areas.

Study skills enhancement to allow students to work with a time management peer guide to get (and stay) on track moving forward.

Quantitative assessment for new students (QANS) to measure a student’s literacy in learning targets needed for the quantitative components of most entry-level natural sciences and social sciences classes and provides support where gaps exist.

Writing Center

The Writing Center serves both students and faculty in their quests to become better writers. All are welcome to come and discover techniques for writing (and teaching) more clearly and effectively.

Through this office, you can find:

Peer-led consultations about the essays and projects students prepare for classes as well as creative writing, presentation preparation and career-focused writing (e.g., cover letters or resumes).

One-credit writing tutorial classes that include ACEN 100 for first-years and ACEN 300 for juniors and seniors.

Peer-paired appointments to benefit students who want substantial assistance with writing over time but cannot take a tutorial class. The student is paired with a peer writing consultant who meets with them weekly to read writing aloud and discuss. This helps with accountability and seeing progress over the long-term.

Questions? Contact the Writing Center

We’re here to help with any questions or concerns you might have about the Writing Center and how this service can help you during whatever academic journey you’re on.

Contact Matthew Duffus, director of the Writing Center.

COURSES & CURRICULUM

Many courses are also offered to help build your knowledge of academia and support your journey towards graduation. Your adviser can suggest you taking one of the courses below to help you get the most from your Earlham experience.

Develop essential writing knowledge and skills including planning, writing thesis statements, researching, citing, revising and editing. Gain confidence through practicing writing in-class and workshopping writing from other classes.

  • Appropriate for students with first-year status
  • Offered in the fall semester
  • Does not fulfill general education requirements

This course is an overview of the major areas of foundational mathematics. Topics will be drawn from number theory and arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, probability and statistics. Common motivations for taking this course have been preparation for later coursework, review for the GRE, teacher preparation or an academic advisor’s recommendation.

  • Cross-listed with MATH 110
  • Appropriate for students with first-year status
  • Offered in the spring semester
  • Does not fulfill general education requirements

The topics in this course will strengthen your knowledge of the quantitative skills expected for most natural science and social science entry-level courses. Common motivations for taking this class have been preparation for later coursework with quantitative components or an academic adviser’s recommendation.

  • Cross-listed with MATH 115
  • Appropriate for students with first-year status
  • Offered in the fall semester
  • Does not fulfill general education requirements

The goal of this course is to promote student success at Earlham College and beyond. Students will be introduced to various campus resources, learn time management skills, understand academic success strategies and gain skills as a resident of the Earlham community. This course will help students recognize their capacities and strengths. It will also help students overcome any mental blocks that may stand in their way of success. In addition, it will help students identify the specific steps to understanding their individual learning style to assist students achieve their academic success.

  • Appropriate for students with first year status.
  • Offered both fall and spring semesters
  • Does not fulfill General Education Requirements

The LIFT Program matches small groups of first-generation students with a personal research librarian during seven weeks of fall semester. Every LIFT student is awarded an iPad to use for the four years at Earlham and beyond. Course content centers on information literacy.

  • Requires application
  • Appropriate for students with first-year status
  • Offered in the fall semester
  • Does not fulfill general education requirements

This course is designed as a second semester component to the LIFT Program. Throughout our semester we will seek to identify personal strengths and goals for your time here at Earlham and beyond. Career discernment and development should not wait until your senior year. Rather, each year, you want to give yourself the space to explore. Given that the semester is often jam packed for the traditional Earlham student, one of the best times to partake in an experiential learning experience (like an internship) is during the summer. Because of this, we will be focusing the bulk of our work on planning and securing a placement for this summer.

  • Pre-requisite: ACEN 145
  • Appropriate for students with first-year status
  • Offered in the spring semester
  • Does not fulfill general education requirements

This course will help you navigate the difficulties of extended writing, explore career-based writing and discuss genres of writing essential for graduate school and job applications. This course is suitable for students with junior or senior status who are looking toward future writing situations and long-term writing projects.

  • Offered in the spring semester
  • Fulfills upper-level credit requirement

The Kenlee Ray ’67 Library & Archives Fellows program advances career discovery. This course is designed for students interested in the library, archives or related library information science professions. You will undertake project work, meet with library personnel and discuss readings under the supervision of Earlham Libraries administrative faculty.

This course is an on-campus May term for juniors and seniors planning to take the general GRE in preparation for graduate school.

  • Offered in the May term
  • Fulfills upper-level credit requirement

Quick links and resources

Earlham is committed to supporting you and accommodating your needs to make your experience here a transformative one. In that effort, we offer resources and opportunities to ensure your success and retention.

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