Andy Moore, Ph.D.

Professor of Earth and environmental science

Phone:765.983.1672
Email:[email protected]
Pronouns:He/him/his

Department: Earth and Environmental Science
Japanese Studies

Program: 3-2 Pre-Engineering
East Asian Studies

Location: Dennis Hall Room 313
801 National Road
Richmond, Indiana 47374

About me

I love Earlham’s emphasis on societally relevant study. I come to geology with a hazards perspective–my research background is in tsunami and coastal deposition–but my passion is teaching undergraduate students. All of my courses include a field component, and I frequently lead longer field trips to places like Yellowstone National Park, Niagara Falls, Japan and lots of places with interesting geology within a day’s drive of Earlham. I particularly enjoy field research with students and have brought Earlham students with me to Nova Scotia, Tanzania, the Gulf Coast, and many places in Japan.

Outside of work, I enjoy woodworking, knitting, gardening, and travel with my family.

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Washington
  • M.S., University of Washington
  • B.A., Carleton College

Professional memberships

Research projects

Most of my research involves tsunami deposits and coastal deposition. Much of my work has been conducted in Japan, in Hokkaido on several ancient tsunamis, and in Okinawa on a tsunami from 1771. I’ve also worked on modern tsunamis quite a bit, including surveys of the 1996 Irian Jaya, 1999 Vanuatu, 2004 Indian Ocean, 2006 Java, 2007 Solomon Islands, and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis. I don’t tend to work on these much anymore because of the difficulty in bringing students to disaster areas on such short notice.

Earlham students are currently working with me on the following projects:

  • Coastal processes in maritime Canada – Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Ancient tsunamis in east Africa – Tanzania
  • Whitewater River Dam Removal Assessment – Richmond, Indiana

Published works

*denotes Earlham student

Maselli, V., Oppo, D., Moore, A., Gusman, A., Mtelela, C., Iacopini, D., Taviani, M., Mjema, E. Mulaya, E., Che, M.*, Tomioka, A.*, Mshiu, E., Ortiz., J., 2020. A 1000-yr-old tsunami in the Indian Ocean points to greater risk for East Africa. Geology 48 (8): 808–813. doi: https://doi.org/10.1130/G47257.1

Che M.*, Maselli V., Moore A., Mulaya E., Oppo D., Tomioka A.* 2018. Stratigraphy of a tidal delta near Mbweni, Tanzania. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. Vol. 50, No. 6. doi: 10.1130/abs/2018AM-322322

Tomioka, A.*, Che, M.*, Maselli V., Moore A., Mulaya E., Oppo, D. 2018. SFM Sediment flux estimation on a tidal delta near Mbweni, Tanzania. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. Vol. 50, No. 6. doi: 10.1130/abs/2018AM-322271

Delbecq, K.L.*, Moore, A.L., Marshall, E.W.*, Nishimura, Y., Nakamura, Y., Hirakawa, K., 2010. 3D mapping and sedimentary analysis of extensive tsunami deposits near Tokachi, Hokkaido, Japan. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2010, abstract id. EP21A-0741.

Delbecq, K.*, W. Nutter*, Y. Nishimura, Y. Nakumura, K. Hirakawa, and Moore, A., 2008. Moderate Tsunamis, Great Storms Leave Little Sedimentary Record on Tokachi Coast, Hokkaido, Japan. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. Vol. 40, No. 6, p.161.

Nutter, N.*, Delbecq, K.*, Nishimura, Y., Nakumura, Y., Hirakawa, K., and Moore, A., 2008. Sedimentary Evidence for Great Tsunamis near Tokachi, Hokkaido, Japan. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. Vol. 40, No. 6, p.161.

More publications can be found on my Google Scholar profile.