Photo of Betsy Schlabach.

Betsy Schlabach, Ph.D.

Associate professor of African and African American studies; associate professor of history

Phone:765.983.1425
Email:[email protected]
Pronouns:She/her/hers

Department: African and African American Studies
History

Program: Sports Management applied minor

Location: Landrum Bolling Center Room 323
801 National Road
Richmond, Indiana 47374

About me

I am a scholar of Black Chicago history, urban history, geography, popular culture, gender and sexuality studies, sports history/gaming culture, and American studies. I am the author of Along the Streets of Bronzeville: Black Chicago’s Literary Landscape (University of Illinois Press, 2013) and am particularly interested in exploring the arts and literary history of Bronzeville, as contoured by its urban history and the built environment.

Outside of Earlham, I enjoy spending time with my family and friends scattered about the Midwest and East Coast. A former college athlete, I also enjoy sports and try to attend as many athletic events as possible. Richmond has a very active running and swimming community, which I hope to join soon.

The most attractive thing about teaching at Earlham is the small liberal arts college setting. Here I feel I really get to know my students in the small classroom environment. Teaching this way becomes more collaborative. Everyday I step into a classroom I have the opportunity not only to teach my students something new, but I too have the opportunity to learn as well. I think Earlham does a great job of facilitating that and keeping me energized as a teacher-scholar.

Education

  • Ph.D., Saint Louis University
  • M.A., Lehigh University
  • B.A., Valparaiso University

Professional memberships

Scholarly interest

My scholarly interests include Black Chicago history, urban history, geography, popular culture, gender and sexuality studies, sports history/gaming culture, and American studies. I am particularly interested in exploring the arts and literary history of Bronzeville as contoured by its urban history and the built environment.

I am expanding my research and publishing skillset by looking into ways I can develop a history of Bronzeville as a Digital Humanities project–I am very excited to see where this might take my research along with new course topics. Finally, I am investigating the relationship between gender, race, and ethnicity and policy gambling in early 20th century Chicago.

Published works

Publications
Along the Streets of Bronzeville: Black Chicago’s Literary Landscape. University of Illinois Press, 2013. http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/83gwr7wk9780252037825.html

“Gender and the Policy Game.” The Journal of Ephemera. Volume 15. no. 3 (May 2013): 20-22.

“Miscegenation.” Multicultural America. Carlos E. Cortes and J. Greggory Golson, Editors. SAGE Multimedia Publications, 2013.

“Ebony Magazine.” Multicultural America. Carlos E. Cortes and J. Greggory Golson, Editors. SAGE Multimedia Publications, 2013.

“The Dialectics of Placelessness and Boundedness in Richard Wright and Gwendolyn Brooks’ Fictions: Crafting the South Side’s Literary Landscape.” The Chicago Black Renaissance. Darlene Clark Hine, Editor. University of Illinois Press, 2012.

“Du Bois’ Theory of Beauty: Battles of Femininity in Darkwater and Dark Princess.” Journal of African American Studies. Volume 16. no. 3 (2012): 498-510.

“Richard Lee Jones.” African American National Biography Online. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Editors. Oxford University Press Online. 2010.

“Emerson’s Platonic Influence: Working Toward a ‘Well Colored and Shaded Globe,’ “America and the Black Body: Identity Politics in Print and Visual Culture.  Carol Henderson, Editor. Madison, NJ: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2009.

“‘Sexual Racism’ and Reality Television: Privileging the White Male Prerogative on MTV’s The Real World: Philadelphia.” How Real Is Reality TV?: The Role of Representation in Reality Television. David Escoffery, Editor. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press, 2006.

Book Reviews 
“The Muse of Bronzeville: African American Creative Expression in Chicago, 1932-1950 by Robert Bone and Richard A. Courage (Review).” African American Review, Forthcoming.   

“Race and Renaissance: African Americans in Pittsburgh Since World War II by Joe W. Trotter and Jared N. Day (Review).” Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas, Forthcoming.    

“The History of White People by Nell Irvin Painter (Review)” and “A Faithful Account of the Race: African American Historical Writing in Nineteenth-Century America by Stephen G. Hall (Review).”  African American Review, Volume 44, Number 3, (Fall 2011): 522-525.   

Conference Presentations
2013
“Female Movers in Bronzeville’s Policy Game.” The Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Jacksonville, Florida.   

“Till and Jet Magazine’s Beauty of the Week.” The Organization of American Historians. San Francisco, California.   

2012
“Chicago’s Policy Women: Ethnic Neighborhoods and the Politics of Luck.” New York Metro American Studies Association. New York, New York.   

“Jet Magazine—Negotiating Violent Imagery.” Southern Association of Women Historians. Fort Worth, Texas.    

2011
“Chicago’s Ladies Play Their Odds: Women and the Policy Racket.” Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Richmond, Virginia.   

“Bronzeville’s Policy Kings: Philanthropists or Shrewd Urban Businessmen?” Triangle African American History Colloquium. Chapel Hill, North Carolina.    

2010
“Bronzeville’s Policy Kings: Economies of Virtue and Vice.” The Space Between Society. Portland, Oregon.   

2009
“History Gave Grant Park Another Chance: Considering Place and a Civil Rights Trajectory.” American Studies Association. Washington, D.C.   

“Bronzeville at 47th and South Parkway: Business and the Literary Landscape.” Labor and Working Class History Association.  Chicago, Illinois.    

“Gwendolyn Brooks’ Double V Campaign: Setting a Tone for Civil Rights.” Southern American Studies Association.  Fairfax, Virginia.   

2008
“The Stroll District: Chicago’s African American Promenade, 1916.” American Studies Association. Albuquerque, New Mexico.