Anand Pardhanani, Ph.D.

Associate professor of mathematics

Phone:765.983.1683
Email:[email protected]
Pronouns:He/him/his

Department: Data Science
Mathematics

Program: 3-2 Pre-Engineering

Location: Center for Science and Technology Room 210
801 National Road
Richmond, Indiana 47374

About me

My area of scholarly interest is applied mathematics, broadly construed, with emphasis on math modeling, simulation, analysis and applications to real-life problems in the arts, sciences and society. 

I love to travel, particularly to new countries. For the last five years my favorite travel region has been Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand, Laos and Vietnam. I also have a long history of activism and interest in gender equity issues, and in anti-war work. I am also fond of meditation and have explored a wide range of meditation styles and practices from around the world for the past 15 years.

I am deeply interested in social justice and believe it is the role of the academy to not only instill awareness in students but also inspire their desire to act to create a sustainable, just, non-coercive and non-militaristic society. Earlham’s principles and practices, based on Quaker values, are strongly synergistic with these interests and are the single most important reason why I chose to come to Earlham.

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin
  • M.S., University of Texas, Austin
  • B.S., Indian Institute of Technology

Professional memberships

Research projects

Collaborative student research experiences

I have organized two separate semester-long research projects with Earlham students on the following topics: (1) “Mathematical projects in service of social justice and public policy” (spring 2011); and (2) “Spots, stripes, spirals, and more: Exploration of pattern formation in nature” (spring 2010).  Each project involved four students. Their majors ranged from mathematics to economics to chemistry. For the project on social justice, students investigated the gender gap between the physical sciences and the life sciences at Earlham. They also worked on mathematically modeling the spread of grassroots political movements, using differential equations concepts. Students presented their work in the form of research posters and papers at the Butler University Undergraduate Research Conference in April 2011.

In the spring 2010 pattern formation research study, students investigated differential equations models for simulating common patterns seen in animal coats. They also explored patterns in music and used differential equations to create simple musical pieces. The results from their work were presented at the Butler University Undergraduate Research Conference in April 2010.

Scholarly interest

My area of scholarly interest is applied mathematics, broadly construed, with emphasis on math modeling, simulation, analysis and applications to real-life problems in the arts, sciences and society.  Some recent areas of work include modeling flood-related phenomena such as dam breaks and tsunami run-ups; composing musical variations via differential equations; investigating the formation of patterns in animal coats.