Course catalog

As a liberal arts college, we facilitate close interaction between faculty and students while grounding our curricula in the liberal arts disciplines: humanities, natural sciences, social sciences and visual and performing arts.

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wdt_ID Course prefix Course number Course level Course title Credit hour(s) Course description General education
1 ART 115 100 Art: Context and Meaning I 4 Presents a thematic introduction of world architecture and art from prehistoric times to the Gothic period. Draws from a variety of academic disciplines and is designed to increase appreciation and understanding of art as related to its cultural context. Develops critical thinking and analytical skills in response to visual experience. D-I
2 ART 116 100 Art: Context and Meaning II 4 Presents an introduction of world architecture and art from the Renaissance to the present. Draws from a variety of academic disciplines and is designed to increase appreciation and understanding of art as it relates to its cultural context. Develops critical thinking and analytical skills in response to visual experience. Also listed as MUSE 116. D-I
3 ART 210 200 History of Craft 4 An examination of the history of craft from ancient times to the present. Explores indigenous craft and contemporary craft theory as related to the fine arts. (Offered alternative years.) D-I
4 ART 211 200 20th Century Art 4 A broad survey that begins by setting the groundwork for art of the 20th century with a discussion of the late 19th century artistic movements of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, and the forces that lured artists away from the confines of academic painting. Explores the social and political forces, as well as the theoretical discourses that frame the major modern and post-modern art movements of the 20th century. Includes Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. (Offered alternative years.)
5 ART 213 200 19th Century Art 4 This global survey of nineteenth-century visual culture will examine canonical European movements (Impressionism, Aestheticism, etc.) and alternative modernisms from the Americas, Asia and Africa. Students will learn how to analyze visual media and situate artworks within a wider social field, considering how industrialization, colonization, science and politics shaped artistic practice. D-I
6 ART 250 200 Making Art: Content, Form and Expression 4 Introduction to the context and content of contemporary art making, formal elements of visual arts, including composition, color and design. Emphasis is placed on articulating ideas and critiquing works of art. Intended for Art majors who should take this class during the Sophomore year.
7 ART 333 300 History of Photography 4 Presents the history and interpretation of photography — as a scientific discovery and as an art form — from its beginnings in Western Europe in 1839 to present-day practice around the world. The course is designed to increase appreciation and understanding of photographic art as it relates to its cultural context and to develop critical thinking and analytical skills in response to visual experience. Attention will be given to geographic areas traditionally ignored in photography survey courses, such as the development of photography on the African and Asian continents. Prerequisite: ART 115, ART 116, ART 211, ART/JNLM 235 or the consent of the instructor.
8 ART 382 300 Special Topics 4 Selected topics determined by the instructor for upper-level study. Recent topics include: Art Since 1967; Matisse, Picasso and Early Modernism, and Renaissance & Baroque seminar. Prerequisite: At least one other Art History course or consent of the instructor.
9 ART 402 400 Curatorial Practicum 4 The student will gain experience in many facets of museum practice including art handling, documentation, research, writing and presentation Working one-on-one with the Curator of the Earlham Art Collection, each student will select a group of works from the Collection to study. The course will culminate in an exhibit in Ronald Gallery or the Landrum Bolling Center. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Also listed as MUSE 402. RCH
10 ART 200 200 Ceramics I 4 An introduction to idea development and the forming of clay objects using ceramic processes and techniques that include hand building and wheel work along with surface treatment development and kiln firing methods. The course explores contemporary approaches to ceramics taught through a series of projects that incorporate research along with technical problems, readings, discussions, demonstrations and group critiques.

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