The Program

A Students' Perspective

"Choosing my comprehensive exam questions and working through those essays [as a Senior] was probably one of the most difficult yet helpful exercises in helping me develop my own thinking. I was forced to hunker down and think through again and again competing ideas and arguments that I had heard and develop my own understanding of them. As grueling as it was writing those four essays, they helped demonstrate clearly and explicitly to myself how deeply I care about these issues." Kumar Jensen (2012), final reflective essay.

General Education Requirements

The Department offers one course that fulfills the International component of the Perspectives on Diversity Requirement, ENPR 327; one course that fulfills the Scientific Requirement, ENPR 315; one course that meets the Wellness Requirement, ENPR 210; and two courses that meet the Comprative Practices Requirement, ENPR 305 and 364.

The Major

Core Requirements

  • ENST 240 Environment and Society
  • ENST 363 Field Experience
  • ENST 488 Senior Capstone Experience

Natural Science Requirement

  • Choose one of the following courses:
    • BIOL 111 Ecological Biology
    • CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry
    • GEOS 201 Environmental Geology OR GEOS 211 Physical Geology
    • PHYS 120 General Physics I OR PHYS 125 Analytical Physics I
  • Plus an additional course (at the 200-level or above) within the same department (if in GEOS it needs to be 300 level).

Quantitative Requirement

  • One of the following two courses:
    • MATH 120 Elementary Statistics
    • ECON 204 Statistics for Economics
  • The following course:
    • ECON 100 Introduction to Economics

Emphasis: Students choose ONE emphasis plus ONE ADDITIONAL COURSE in the other emphasis

  • Culture and Context (Philosophical and Socio-Cultural Perspectives)
  • Politics and Policy (Economics and Politics Perspectives)

Culture and Context

    • Choose FOUR of the following courses:
      • PAGS 240 Global Dynamics and World Peace
      • ENST/ENG 305 American Literature and Ecology
      • ENST 315 Environmental Issues of New Zealand (New Zealand Program)
      • ENST/EDUC 320 Pedagogies of Place
      • ENST/SOAN 327 Indigenous Peoples and the Environment
      • SOAN 341 Contemporary Social Thought
      • ENST/SOAN 362 Cultural Politics of Environment: Great Lakes Region
      • ENST 0340 Political Economy of Food and Migration (Border Studies Fall Program)
      • Other courses may apply with approval of the major adviser and program convener.

Politics and Policy

    • Choose FOUR of the following courses:
      • POLS 101 Introduction to Politics
      • POLS 321 Environmental Policy I: Climate
      • POLS 379 Environmental Policy II: Energy 
      • POLS 323 Environmental Policy III: International Approaches
      • ENST/POLS 373 International Law: Environment and Development
      • ENST/ECON 343 Economics of the Environment
      • ECON 345 Urban Political Economy
      • Other courses may apply with approval of the major adviser and program convener.

The Minor

Students must take one of the following:

  • BIO 111 Ecological Biology
  • CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry
  • GEOS 201 Environmental Geology

AND

Both of the following:

  • ENST 240 Environment and Society
  • ENST 280 Environmental Colloquium

AND

Three additional ENST courses below comprising 10-12 credits, including one from each of the two thematic areas.

Culture and Context Focus:

  • ENST/ENG 305 American Literature and Ecology
  • ENST 315 Environmental Issues of New Zealand
  • ENST/EDUC 320 Pedagogies of Place
  • ENST/SOAN 327 Indigenous Peoples and the Environment
  • ENST/SOAN 362 Cultural Politics of Environment: Great Lakes Region
  • ENST366/PHIL 363 Bioethics
  • ENST/HIST 364 Westward Movement: Environmental History of the Old Northwest

Politics and Policy Focus:

  • ENST/POLS 300 Comparative Environmental Policy
  • ENST/POLS 301 Politics of the Global Climate Crisis
  • ENST/POLS 302 Politics of the Global Energy Crisis
  • ENST/ECON 343 Economics of the Environment
  • PAGS 343 Conflict Resolution
  • ENST/POLS 373 International Law: Environment and Development
  • PSYC 379 Community Psychology

* Key

Courses that fulfill
General Education Requirements:

  • (A-AP) = Arts - Applied
  • (A-TH) = Arts - Theoretical/Historical
  • (A-AR) = Analytical - Abstract Reasoning
  • (A-QR) = Analytical - Quantitative
  • (D-D) = Diversity - Domestic
  • (D-I) = Diversity - International
  • (D-L) = Diversity - Language
  • (ES) = Earlham Seminar
  • (IE) = Immersive Experience
  • (RCH) = Research
  • (SI) = Scientific Inquiry
  • (W) = Wellness
  • (WI) = Writing Intensive
  • (AY) = Offered in Alternative Year

*ENST 210 OUTDOOR EDUCATION (3 credits)
Examines the foundational theory and practice of the field of Outdoor Education, including team building and group facilitation, experiential education theory, risk management, trip and lesson planning, psychological models of adventure, leadership studies, and diversity. Also listed as EDUC 210. (W)

ENST 240 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY (3 credits)
Introduces theoretical perspectives and practical case studies involved in environmental problems and problem solving while providing context and a foundation for the larger field of Environmental Studies. Multidisciplinary and integrated approach. Draws from the intellectual traditions and ways of knowing of predominantly the Social Sciences and Humanities in assessing environmental issues in historical and modern contexts. Prerequisite: Intended for students planning to major or minor in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies, or consent of the instructor.

ENST 260 TOPICS IN ETHICS: BIOETHICS (4 credits)
Examines contemporary bioethical issues such as genetic therapy and enhancement, human subject research and physician-assisted death. Particular attention to the implications of bioethical issues for under-represented populations in the U.S. and to inter- and trans-national discussions concerning bioethical topics. (AY)

ENST 280 ENVIROMENTAL COLLOQUIUM (1 credit)
Environmentally-themed topics and readings. Opportunity for Environmental Science and Environmental Studies students to discuss a common text and topic. Recent themes: climate change, food ethics, agriculture and sustainable energy. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor(s) and Sophomore standing.

ENST 301 CLIMATE AND ENERGY POLICY (3 credits)
Explores issues surrounding climate and energy policy. Prerequisite: POLS 104, 105, 107 or 170, OR consent of the instructor. Also listed as PAGS 301. (AY)

*ENST 305 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND ECOLOGY (4 credits)
A study of American environmental literature and its imaginative forms in relation to environmental philosophy, including changing ideas of nature and wilderness; representations of space and place; the deep ecology, ecofeminism and environmental justice movements; and the overall relation between human language and value and the non-human world. Attention also to cultural issues of ecology, such as how our ecological understandings affect our sense of identity and our social and economic practices. May include writers such as Thoreau, Abbey, Muir, Snyder, Aldo Leopold, Terry Tempest Williams, Leslie Marmon Silko and Mary Oliver. Prerequisite: An Earlham Seminar, Interpretive Practices course or consent of the instructor. Also listed as ENG 305. (WI) (AY)

ENST 320 PEDAGOGIES OF PLACE (3 credits)
An introduction to environmental philosophy. Explores the formation of our relationship with the natural world and the roles of education and schooling. Concepts of nature, wilderness, ecology and environmentalism considered and critiqued in light of their functioning as "normative ideals" for a right relationship with the more than human world. Prerequisite: Previous courses in ENPR or consent of the instructor. Also listed as EDUC 220. (AY)

ENST 321 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY I: CLIMATE (3 credits)
Examines the basic causes of global weirding (e.g., industrialization, electrification, transportation), the key impacts of global weirding (e.g., water scarcity, extreme weather events, rising sea level), mitigation strategies in various sectors (e.g., food production, water systems, and urban planning), and prominent policy solutions (e.g., carbon tax, cap and trade system, feed-in-tariffs, renewable energy portfolios, clean energy research and development). Students will engage in an extended simulation that will investigate the political constraints to adopting various policy solutions. Also listed as POLS 321. (AY)

ENST 322 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY II: ENERGY (3 credits)
Examine the energy crisis, investigating a broad range of technical and policy alternatives to solve the problem. Students will investigate basic energy science, peak oil, fossil fuel uses, energy efficiency, clean energy, smart grids, and the impacts of solving the energy crisis on our daily lives. Students will engage in a group project aimed at drafting a detailed policy brief assessing a specific energy problem. Also listed as POLS 322. (AY)

ENST 323 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY III: INTERNATIONAL APPROACHES (3 credits)
Examines the climate and energy crises from an international perspective. Explores environmental policy approaches in the European Union, Japan, China, India, Mexico, and Brazil. Students will participate in a comprehensive simulation of an international climate conference, aimed at negotiating an agreement that includes both mitigation and adaptation commitments. Also listed as POLS 323. (D-I) (AY)

*ENST 327 INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND THE ENVIRONMENT (4 credits)
Small-scale societies traditionally studied by anthropologists have become the "indigenous peoples" of the world. Under the jurisdiction of nation-states that consider them alien and inferior, they are among the world's most underprivileged minorities. Focuses on indigenous peoples in three nation-states of the British diaspora: Australia, Canada and the United States. Analyzes the following topics through an environmental lens: 1) traditional subsistence practices, 2) historical forces of colonization and 3) contemporary issues and struggles. Also listed as SOAN 327. (D-I) (AY)

ENST 343 ECONOMICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT (4 credits)
An examination of the role that economic analysis plays in understanding the environment and the policy frameworks that economics offers in the area of environmental regulation. Topics include an analysis of market failures, the cost-benefit framework and strategies related to environmental policy. A number of applications related to domestic and international environmental issues discussed. Prerequisite: ECON 103. Also listed as ECON 343. (AY)

ENST 347 COMPARATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY (3 credits)
Examines the different approaches taken by the European Union, Japan and the United States in addressing the monumental policy challenges of 21st-century crises. Explores issues of climate change, energy shortages and increasing pressures on national and regional institutions. Prerequisite: POLS 104, 105 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as POLS 347. (AY)

ENST 362 CULTURAL POLITICS OF ENVIRONMENT: GREAT LAKES REGION (4 credits)
Introduces the general field of environmental anthropology through in-depth examination of specific case studies in environmental issues. Focuses on the Great Lakes region; U.S. and Canadian social and political institutions and relations between the two nations provide crucial context for analyzing these environmental issues. Features a virtual ethnography project through which student groups research pollution hot spots around the Great Lakes. Also listed as SOAN 362. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. (AY)

ENST 363 BIOETHICS (4 credits)
Introduces students to the major theoretical discussions and practical actions in the field of bioethics, with a focus on the implications that these discourses and practices have for a diverse and multicultural world. Includes an introduction to essential bioethical terminology and to a breadth of ethical theories and perspectives. Specific topics covered may include: human subject research, genetic technologies, justice and health care allocation, end of life alternatives, and so on. Prerequisite: Second-year standing or above. Also listed as PHIL 363 and PAGS 363. (WI)

*ENST 364 WESTWARD MOVEMENT: ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE OLD NORTHWEST (4 credits)
Examines the environmental history of Earlham's home, the Old Northwest — from the geological formation of the Great Lakes to tribal uses of the land, but primarily focusing on the last 200 years as the area changes from "wilderness" to family farms to large urban cities and industrial agriculture. Emphasizes the various environmental ethics that shaped resource uses, and the interrelated changes and their consequences — both intended and unintended — for wildlife species, air, soil and water quality, land use and human health, habits and choices. Prerequisite: An Earlham Seminar, an Interpretive Practices course or consent of the instructor. Also listed as HIST 364. (WI) (AY)

ENST 373 INTERNATIONAL LAW II: INTERDEPENDENCE, ENVIRONMENT AND GLOBALIZATION (4 credits)
Surveys concepts and theories of international law and treaty interpretation, focusing on environmental problems and policy making in the global arena. Topics include the emergence of "the environment" as an issue in international politics, managing global common property resources, and sustainable trade and development. Prerequisite: POLS 170. Also listed as POLS 373. (AY)

ENST 481 FIELD EXPERIENCE (1-3 credits)
Provides a first-hand opportunity to integrate theory gained in the classroom with insights and experience into the workings of an organization gained in a field setting. Available only to declared Environmental Studies majors. Students must complete a Field Study application in consultation with their major adviser and complete 120 hours of work at an approved site of their choosing. Prerequisite: ENPR 240.

ENST 485 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)

ENST 488 SENIOR SEMINAR/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 credits)
Students complete a Senior Capstone Experience in the discipline of their focus.

New Zealand Program Courses

*ENST 315 ENVIROMENTAL ISSUES OF NEW ZEALAND (4 credits)
Provides an overview to the unique species and landscapes of this island country as well as its many environmental challenges. Topics vary but generally include natural history of New Zealand, island biogeography, conservation and restoration ecology, natural resource use and sustainability. Taught on the New Zealand semester program. (SI)

ENST 320 NEW ZEALAND FACULTY SEMINAR (4 credits)
Taught on the New Zealand semester by program faculty on an environmental topic of interest.

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Earlham College, an independent, residential college, aspires to provide the highest-quality undergraduate education in the liberal arts, including the sciences, shaped by the distinctive perspectives of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).

Earlham College
801 National Road West
Richmond, Indiana
47374-4095
1-765-983-1200 — Main Switchboard
1-800-EARLHAM (327-5426) — Admissions