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* Key

Courses that fulfill
General Education Requirements:

  • (A-AR) = Analytical - Abstract Reasoning
  • (A-QR) = Analytical - Quantitative
  • (D-D) = Diversity - Domestic
  • (D-I) = Diversity - International
  • (D-L) = Diversity - Language
  • (ES) = Earlham Seminar
  • (IE) = Immersive Experience
  • (RCH) = Research
  • (W) = Wellness
  • (WI) = Writing Intensive
  • (AY) = Offered in Alternative Year

Most International Studies courses are listed by their individual departments alone. This is because the determination as to whether or not a course counts for the major depends on the shape of the student’s individual focus. Exceptions include required introductory courses and the capstone.

*INST 100 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the 'economic way of thinking.' It focuses on micro and macro issues and attempts to give the student a way to apply these concepts in different historical, political, social, global and ethical contexts. Macroeconomic topics include aggregate economic measures, income determination and macro policy. Micro topics include marginal and cost-benefit analysis as applied to consumers and firms, market structures, income distribution, market failures and the role of the state in a micro context. Also listed as ECON 100, MGMT 100 and PAGS 100. (A-AR)

INST 102 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
(3 credits)
This course is designed to offer students a broad introduction to international studies. It addresses major actors of international system including state and non-state actors and also covers a variety of issues and topics (poverty, climate change, international terrorism, refugee, war, etc.) that are widely concerned across the world. The course focuses on these themes from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives to allow students to examine the world in an interdisciplinary way. Appropriate for first-year students.

INST 111 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS (3 credits)
This broad introductory course launches the formal study of Politics at the college level, exploring the distinct yet complementary subfields of the discipline, most importantly Political Theory, Comparative Politics, American Politics and International Relations. Students in this course, no matter what subfield interests them most, begin to address enduring questions about global phenomena with both theoretical practical implications. Students also will practice research and writing skills, and engage in political debates about questions both historical and contemporary. This course is a pre-requisite for upper division work in the Politics major and serves as a gateway to those interested in International Studies, PAGS and environmental policy work. Also listed as PAGS 111 and POLS 111.

*INST 170 INTRODUCTION TO DIPLOMACY (3 credits)
An experiential course that examines political, economic and social issues in world politics by simulating the work of states in U.N. committees and organizations. Students serve as delegates to a regional Model U.N. Scholarly readings on the practice of diplomacy. Also listed as PAGS 170 and POLS 170. (D-I)

INST 348 INTERNATIONAL TRADE (3 credits) 
Through a combination of theoretical frameworks and real world applications, attempts to develop a broad understanding of micro and macro issues in the area of international economics. Deals with issues related to the logic and critique of free trade, tariffs and quotas, exchange rate determination, balance of payments, open economy macro policy, stabilization policy and the role of international institutions in international trade. Prerequisites: ECON 100. Also listed as MGMT 348 and ECON 348. (AY)

INST 350 POLITICAL ECONOMY IN CHINA AND INDIA (3 credits)
This course will focus on two aspects of the political economy of China and India. First, it will undertake a comparative examination of the economic performance of these countries since the 1940s, taking into account important historical and political factors. Second, it will look into what the future may hold for these two countries. Prerequisite: ECON 100 or consent of instructor. Also listed as CHIN 350 and ECON 350.

*INST 358 CONTEMPORARY CHINESE POLITICS (3 credits)
This course provides students with a broad introduction to China's politics in the modern period. The focus will be on top leaders, political institutions and policies under Chinese Communist Party (CCP) rule. The course covers the main stages in the history of CCP rule: the Mao Zedong period,1949-1976; the Deng Xiaoping period, 1977-1994; and the rule of the so-called third- and fourth-generation leaders, Jiang Zemin, 1995-2003, and Hu Jintao, 2003-1012. A.R.T.S. designation: R. Prerequisite: Politics 111 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as POLS 358 and CHIN 358. (D-I, WI)

INST 364 POWER, POLITICS, THEORY (3 credits)
This course surveys the classical texts and themes of political theory. Students will read selections of both the Western and Eastern canonical works in order to investigate a wide range of issues related to politics — power, state, citizen, justice, community, identity, rights, liberty, etc. Prerequisite: POLS 111. Also listed as PAGS 364 and POLS 364.

INST 362 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3 credits)
This course analyzes international markets and risks from the perspective of investors, managers, regulators and other stakeholders. Key topics include exchange rates, capital flows, risk analysis and management, valuation, and private-public partnerships. Topics are studied in real-world contexts through case studies, current events, and collaborative research projects. Prerequisite: either MGMT 141, MGMT 200, MGMT 240 or PSYCH 245. Also listed as ECON 362 and MGMT 362.

*INST 371 THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (4 credits)
Examines classics, trends and innovations in empirical and normative theories of international relations, from Thucydides and Machiavelli to Galtung and beyond. Reading and writing intensive. Provides opportunities for students to apply theoretical perspectives to problems and issues of particular salience to them (e.g. questions raised by off-campus study). Designed for juniors and seniors. A.R.T.S. Designation: A, R or T, depending on semester. Prerequisite: POLS 111 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as PAGS 371 and POLS 371. (D-I) (AY)

INST 488 SENIOR CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 credits)
Seniors participate in a colloquium with faculty members representing Politics, Economics, History, Language and Literature in cross-disciplinary conversation about a common theme such as migration, nationalism, or globalization. Students write an interdisciplinary literature review and comparative analysis of the assigned problem and make a public presentation.