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* Key

Courses that fulfill
General Education Requirements:

  • (A-AR) = Analytical - Abstract Reasoning
  • (A-QR) = Analytical - Quantitative
  • (D-D) = Diversity - Domestic
  • (D-I) = Diversity - International
  • (D-L) = Diversity - Language
  • (ES) = Earlham Seminar
  • (IE) = Immersive Experience
  • (RCH) = Research
  • (W) = Wellness
  • (WI) = Writing Intensive
  • (AY) = Offered in Alternative Year

*GER 101 BASIC GERMAN I (5 credits)
Proficiency-oriented language course emphasizes the development of language skills and cultural competence. Incorporates the national Standards for Language Learning: Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections and Communities; and the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal and Presentational. (D-L)

*GER 102 BASIC GERMAN II (5 credits)
A continuation of German 101. Prerequisite: GER 101 or equivalent. (D-L)

*GER 201 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN (4 credits)
Continues to develop language and cultural competence and to improve reading strategies. Prerequisite: GER 102 or equivalent. (D-L)

GER 301 ADVANCED GERMAN (3 credits)
Develops a number of competencies, including knowing about text types and discourse genres, developing analytical and critical thinking skills, and using advanced grammatical structures to communicate in culturally appropriate contexts. Prerequisite: GER 201 or equivalent.

GER 302 ADVANCED GERMAN CONVERSATION (1 credit)
Concentrates primarily on developing and using students' oral skills to communicate in culturally appropriate contexts. Prerequisite: GER 102 or equivalent. (AY)

*GER 304 JUDAISM, THE OTHER AND STATE: ENCOUNTERS IN MODERN JEWISH THOUGHT (3 credits)
What does it mean to be Jewish in the modern world? This seminar considers the political and theological challenges of modern Judaism, from European Jewish emancipation to the present day. The class will discuss the rise of Jewish voices in the public sphere; the complex relationship between modern Jewish and Christianity, conflicts over history, science and biblical interpretation and the rise of Jewish nationalism. Students also will consider how the Jewish minority experience compares to experiences of other religious and cultural minorities in the modern West. Also listed as JWST 304 and REL 304. (D-I, WI)

GER 343 WOMEN IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3 credits)
Critical reading of representative works. Focuses on the contributions of women to the literary life and cultures of German-speaking countries. Also explores myths and misconceptions regarding women by addressing questions of image and reality. Prerequisite: GER 301 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as WGSS 343. (AY)

*GER 344 NEW VOICES: GERMAN JEWISH WRITERS (2 credits)
Examines issues of Jewish identity in Germany and Austria and what it is like to live as a Jew in German-speaking Europe. This seven-week seminar studies the prose, poetry and essays of German Jewish writers who respond to these issues in a variety of ways. Also listed as JWST 344. Offered in German (first seven weeks) and English (second seven weeks). (D-I) (AY)

*GER 345 NEW VOICES: GERMANS OF COLOR (2 credits)
Introduces students to texts written by Afro-Germans as well as texts by authors with migration backgrounds. Explores the cultural, ethnic and religious diversity of contemporary German-speaking countries through literary and non-literary texts, films and music. Also listed as AAAS 345. Offered in English (first seven weeks) and in German (second seven weeks). (D-I) (AY)

*GER 346 CLASSIC AND CONTEMPORARY GERMAN FILM (3 credits)
Examines films in the historical and social contexts from the Expressionist period of the early 1920s to contemporary German cinema. Also looks at cinema as an art form and film style. Also listed as FILM 346. (DI) (AY)

GER 407 TRANSLATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE (3 credits)
Considers a range of issues in translation, which may include comparative stylistics, gender in translation and machine translation. In addition to readings, discussion and research on particular aspects of translation, students design and carry out individual and group translation projects. Prerequisite: GER 301. (AY)

GER 408 CONTEMPORARY GERMAN SPEAKING COUNTRIES (3 credits)
Explores cultural, socio-economic and political developments in Germany, Austria and Switzerland since 1945. Prerequisite: GER 301 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. (AY)

GER 454 DRAMA AND DRAMATIC TRADITION (4 credits)
Explores drama as an enduring art form and looks at the essential characteristics of a dramatic work. Examines significant works from the Middle Ages to the present. Discusses drama as an art form that depends on and challenges tradition within German and Austrian cultural history. Prerequisite: GER 301 or consent of the instructor. (AY)

GER 455 GERMAN NARRATIVE (4 credits)
Introduces students to a number of significant works of German prose and to critical evaluation of those texts. Examines both literary and non-literary texts from the Middle Ages to the present and explores how they reflect the culture and times in which they were written. Prerequisite: GER 301 or consent of the instructor. (AY)

GER 481 INTERNSHIPS, FIELD STUDIES AND OTHER FIELD EXPERIENCES (1-3 credits)

GER 482 SPECIAL TOPICS (3 credits)
Topics vary.

GER 483 TEACHING ASSISTANTS (1-3 credits)
Reserved for International Teaching Assistants.

GER 484 STUDENT/FACULTY RESEARCH PROJECT (1-4 credits)
Collaborative research with faculty.

GER 485 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)
Intended for advanced students. An investigation of a specific topic conceived and planned by the student in consultation with a faculty adviser.

GER 488 SENIOR CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 credits)
Designed to serve the broadest possible mix of interests of Junior and Senior majors. Topics vary.

Germany/Austria Program Courses

ART 352 ART HISTORY (3 credits)
With special attention to Baroque and fin-de-si├Ęcle Vienna, the course introduces the history of western art. Regular museum visits and excursions take advantage of the vast architectural and artistic treasures of Vienna.

GER 301 GERMAN LANGUAGE (6 credits)
Intensive language course offered in Marburg and Berlin. Helps students gain language and cultural competence. In-class work is complemented by a number of course-related excursions.

GER 350 AUSTRIAN LITERATURE (3 credits)
Focuses primarily on works from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Examines both literary and non-literary texts in the context of the powerful political and social changes taking place in Austria and Europe.

*GER 355 AUSTRIA AND THE EUROPEAN UNION (3 credits)
Introduces the history of Austria and examines the European integration process after World War II. Examines the structure and role of the European Union; the challenges of EU enlargement; the relationship between Europe and the U.S.; and the role of Europe on the global stage. (D-I)

GER 360 CONTEMPORARY GERMAN CULTURE (2 credits)
Examines issues confronting 21st-century Germans. Topics vary but may include migration and population changes, Germany as a multicultural society, and Germany's role in Europe and in the European Union.

GER 362 ETHNOGRAPHIC PROJECT (1 credit)
Students examine in detail one aspect of German or Austrian culture in which they have a particular interest. Students are not expected to do extensive library research for the project but instead are encouraged to interact with Germans or Austrians and to develop good listening and observation skills. Learning to become effective participant observers is central to the success of the project.

Berlin May Term Course

GER 318 MAY TERM IN BERLIN (3 credits)
Examines ethnic, religious and cultural diversity in Berlin. Focuses on four of the many communities living in the city: Afro-Germans and Germans of African descent, Turkish Germans, Jewish Germans, and Berlin's Muslim population. Explores first, how Germans define diversity, multiculturalism and intercultural living; and second, how Germans respond to their own diversity and address its attendant issues. Examines the historical context of Berlin's multiculturalism and considers its implications for all of Germany and for greater Europe. No prerequisites. Course offered in English. (AY)